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Does your baby´s head have a flat spot?

Baby´s

 

 

Do you remember when it was OK for babies to sleep on their stomachs? The Back to Sleep campaign, which helps to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), is very important, but with it comes some challenges all moms should know. Read on to see what I’ve learned in babies’ battle with flat head syndrome.

Being a mom of twins brings unique obstacles.  Right now, both of my babies have a condition known as Deformational Plagiocephaly (“DP”), which is commonly known as “flat head syndrome”.  In our case, this was caused because of pressure on the babies’ heads, due to the lack of space in the uterus.  My pediatrician says there has been an increase in flat heads, due in large part to the Back to Sleep Campaign, and shared the following responses to some common questions:

1. Q: Doctor, what is the most common cause of DP?
A: Sleeping on the back.

2. Q: When you make an early diagnosis of DP, what course of treatment do you typically recommend?
A: Start physical therapy at one month of age, working on neck stretches and positioning; tummy time to strengthen the neck, and at 4 to 6 months of age, reevaluating the baby’s progress.

3. Q: If that treatment is ineffective what do you recommend next?
A: By 4 to 6 months of age, consider putting on the helmet.

4. Q: What does the helmet do?
A: It prevents the problem from getting worse and allows the head to more naturally mold back to a proper shape.

5. Q:Does every baby need a helmet?
A: No you should consult your physician to take the appropriate course of action.

This little Orthotics device has helped my baby get his flat head back into shape and was a great recommendation made by their pediatrician.  Remember, not every child with a flat head needs a helmet.

Keep in mind that helmet therapy must be started early, and is mostly ineffective after one year and half of age.  So talk to your pediatrician early on.  If it turns out that your baby needs a helmet, don’t worry.  After a few days of adjusting to it, he’ll be fine…and in a few months, he’ll have a perfect little head for life.


 

 



 

 

 

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